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dc.contributor.advisorArkan Tuncel, Zeynep
dc.contributor.authorRadu, Ivan
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-14T08:26:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-09
dc.date.submitted2019-09-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11655/9204
dc.description.abstractIn the context of the collapse of the Soviet Union, a series of separatist movements emerged in the Soviet republics. Following independence, Moldova had to deal with a separatist movement in the Transnistrian region, supported by Russia. The desire not to lose control in the former Soviet area pushed Moscow to get directly involved in the Transnistrian military conflict in 1992. The Russian 14th army that secured the victory of the separatists has been maintained to this day, and after several transformations, changed its status from participant to peacekeeper. The new created separatist republic survived due to its authoritarian regime and economic interests of the Moldovan political elite in Transnistria, a territory outside of the rule of law. In addition to internal obstacles, Russian interventionism pushed by strategic interests in the region represents the main factor that has contributed to the maintenance of the conflict in the current state. Russia is driven by great power ambitions and preservation of its national security to engage in power politics in the strategic area which it calls its ‘near abroad’, of which Moldova is also a part. The main purpose of Russian intervention in Transnistria is not the region itself but Moldova. In order to prevent Chisinau from integrating in NATO and the European Union, which are Russia’s main rivals in the region, Moscow continues to support the Transnistrian separatist regime. The most important instruments of Russian interventionism in Transnistria are: the presence of military troops, political and economic support for the separatist regime and soft power politics in Moldova and Transnistria.tr_TR
dc.language.isoentr_TR
dc.publisherSosyal Bilimler Enstitüsütr_TR
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesstr_TR
dc.subjectMoldova
dc.subjectTransnistria
dc.subjectRussia
dc.subjectPost-Soviet Geography
dc.subjectInterventionism
dc.subjectSeparatist regime
dc.subjectConflict
dc.subjectOSCE
dc.subjectNational security
dc.subjectPower politics
dc.titleSeparatism In The Post-Soviet Geography and Russian Interventionism: The Case of Transnistriatr_TR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesistr_TR
dc.description.ozetIn the context of the collapse of the Soviet Union, a series of separatist movements emerged in the Soviet republics. Following independence, Moldova had to deal with a separatist movement in the Transnistrian region, supported by Russia. The desire not to lose control in the former Soviet area pushed Moscow to get directly involved in the Transnistrian military conflict in 1992. The Russian 14th army that secured the victory of the separatists has been maintained to this day, and after several transformations, changed its status from participant to peacekeeper. The new created separatist republic survived due to its authoritarian regime and economic interests of the Moldovan political elite in Transnistria, a territory outside of the rule of law. In addition to internal obstacles, Russian interventionism pushed by strategic interests in the region represents the main factor that has contributed to the maintenance of the conflict in the current state. Russia is driven by great power ambitions and preservation of its national security to engage in power politics in the strategic area which it calls its ‘near abroad’, of which Moldova is also a part. The main purpose of Russian intervention in Transnistria is not the region itself but Moldova. In order to prevent Chisinau from integrating in NATO and the European Union, which are Russia’s main rivals in the region, Moscow continues to support the Transnistrian separatist regime. The most important instruments of Russian interventionism in Transnistria are: the presence of military troops, political and economic support for the separatist regime and soft power politics in Moldova and Transnistria.tr_TR
dc.contributor.departmentUluslararası İlişkilertr_TR
dc.embargo.termsAcik erisimtr_TR
dc.embargo.lift2019-10-14T08:26:35Z
dc.fundingYoktr_TR


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